DIY Arduino Schematic board and Checklist

Things to consider when designing a custom board, based on an Arduino

DIY Arduino Schematic Banner

One of the last significant steps in a project is designing the custom PCB. This stage means creating a DIY Arduino board that is custom to the application. Two examples of my past projects are BinBoo, a Binary Clock, and Open Vapors, my reflow oven controller.

While working on a project for a friend, I got to thinking; it would be nice to have a checklist for circuit elements to include on a DIY Arduino board. In the early days, I forgot to add a filter cap to AREF, for example.

These tips are based on an 8-bit AVR design, like the ATmega328p chip. You could apply these tips to other 8-bit AVRs. Until now, I have not designed a custom board around a 32-Bit/ARM board. Though at only $16, I would be tempted to just solder the Teensy module directly to my finished board.

Below is a written list of items for a DIY Arduino checklist. If you’d like to see me design this board in KiCad, check out this AddOhms Tutorial.

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What is the Bald Engineer doing?

Caption This!

Bald Engineering Praying

The next AddOhms Tutorial is how to design a DIY Arduino board. What are the elements you need to include in your own circuit design? While editing the video, I ended up on this frame. It looked to me like I was praying. (At one point I was having serious technical issues with my equipment. But it is unrelated to that frame!) On Twitter, my friend Philip had a different take.

You bring the two hemispheres of Plutonium together like this, and then a short while later...

Question: What caption comes to mind when you see this picture? Leave a comment with yours. You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Op-Amp Question

If you can’t think of a caption, maybe you can help with a different question. What your favorite LM741 op amp alternative? I’ve been working on some tutorials and videos on op-amps. I’d like to incorporate something other than the old stand-by.

Watch Archived Video: Unboxing Hackerboxes

Over the past year, I have been a Hackerboxes subscriber. When the first couple arrived, I opened them up immediately. In fact, I got my first ESP32 through Hackerboxes.

Sadly, I got caught up in so many things I stopped opening them causing them pile up. So to close out 2017, I’m Unboxing Hackerboxes live while answering your electronics questions. (more…)

Date:December 31, 2017
Time:09:00-10:00 PST
Appearance:Unboxing Hackerboxes and more Q&A on AddOhms Live
Outlet:YouTube
Format:Vlog

2017’s Best Bald Engineer Tutorials, Articles, and Reviews

The popular tutorials, links, and videos fans watched most.

2017 Enginerd Review

As 2017 comes to a close, I looked back to see what readers made the most popular. It was an exciting year. The Arduino family came back together, Adafruit trolled the internet with rumors of a RadioShack buy out, and for me, I changed jobs.

Project wise I got my RetroPie SNES build completed, using an old Super Famicom case. This case is one I bought in Japan for 500 yen (about $5.) This work also led me to discuss voltage divider circuits. And I looked at a couple of scopes.

In case you missed it, here is what you as a reader found interesting over the past year.

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7 Arduino LCD display tips and tricks

Character LCD tutorial broken down by simple tips

Arduino LCD display

When I started working on Open Vapors, I thought the stumbling point would be the PID algorithm or safe AC line control. However, it turned out; I spent a significant amount of time understanding how to print to the Arduino LCD display correctly.

As I dig into my latest project, the lessons I learned back then are coming back to me. Here are 7 tips for driving an Arduino LCD display, like one with 2×20 or 4×20 characters.

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In April 2017 I backed a project on Kickstarter called “Crazy Circuits.” It looked like a cool concept that was well developed, so I even included it in the Baldengineer Newsletter. I do not typically promote Kickstarter projects–unless they are exceptional in some way. I liked the concept of circuits that worked with existing LEGO-sized boards and pieces. Their shipping was a couple of months off, but nothing compared to some Kickstarter disasters. I received my Crazy Circuits kit in November, compared to the promised September.

The product concept is simple enough I could not put the time into a full write-up or an AddOhms Tutorial video. So, instead, I featured it on an AddOhms Live stream. For example, to connect an LED to a battery, just snap in some conductive “tape.” In the video, I am building my first two circuits ever. I do think the ribbon takes a bit of practice. However, as I said earlier, I like that it adapts to existing LEGO bricks rather well.

If you know someone interested in electronics but afraid of soldering, I think the Crazy Circuits kits are an interesting option. The case they come in is nice. (I know, strange thing to throw out there, but I do like the sorting case.)

After the hands-on, which lasts about 30 minutes, I answer viewer questions. These questions cover op-amps, LEDs, and capacitors.

Watch Crazy Circuits Hands-On, on YouTube

Arduino Keyboard Matrix Code and Hardware Tutorial

Here's how a keyboard works

As a kid, I got the book “Upgrading and Repairing PCs.” (Now in its 22nd edition.) It was the first book to explain to me the PC architecture. I considered, how were there so few pins on an AT-style keyboard connector when there were 101 keys on the keyboard? That is when I first learned about the keyboard matrix.

Intel_P8049_AH_controller

Original image from Deskthority Wiki. (Edited image is shown.)

The keyboard matrix itself did not amaze me, but instead the idea there was an entirely separate 8-bit microcontroller inside of the keyboard. Early keyboards may have used the P8049AH, which, there is still some stock available to purchase. I was fascinated with the idea an entire computer was necessary to run the keyboard, to use my “real” computer. Why did it take something as complicated as a microcontroller?

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Hackaday Superconference 2017 was a blast

Building stuff that matters

Hackaday Superconference 2017

Supplyframe hosted the Hackaday Superconference 2017 in Pasadena the second weekend of November. A couple of years ago I attended the first Supercon in San Francisco. It is amazing how much larger the event has grown. If you have not visited one, here’s a summary of what makes up the conference.

Five elements make up the Superconference: the talks, the learning, the people, the hacking, and the Hackaday Prize.

The Talks

Initially, I planned to write up my thoughts on the top 3 to 5 talks. Here’s the problem: they were all fantastic. Every single presentation. Instead, head over to the Hackaday YouTube channel. Currently, there is not a dedicated playlist. So look for the videos titled “Hackaday 2017.”

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Open Source Hardware Summit 2017 Recap

Open Source Hardware Summit 2017 Quote

This year Denver hosted the 2017 Open Source Hardware Summit. It’s a one-day seminar with talks, demos, and a couple of drinks. The day after the official show Sparkfun and Aleph Objects hosted tours of their facilities. The combination of events made for a fantastic immersion into open source hardware.

There were many talks and demos setup during the summit. Here are three that caught my attention. Please note, this is not to rate or judge the quality of anyone’s work. Simply, a couple of weeks later these are the three talks that stuck with me.

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picoscope 2204a on element14

Previously, I wrote up a hands-on with the PicoScope 2204A. At the time I only spent a few minutes with the device. I used it to “debug” an I2C bus between an Arduino and OLED screen. Since that initial hands-on, I’ve used the PicoScope in my lab. Most notably, I hosted another “hands-on” via an AddOhms Live Stream. I used it for another live stream where I talked about op-amps. Unfortunately, the video isn’t watchable due to some technical difficulties.

However, both of those activities plus debugging a new project I’m working on, gave me a chance to understand this humble USB-based oscilloscope. Now that I’ve held well over a month of bench time with it, I can say I am happy with the 2204A. If you’re looking for a low-cost, but fully featured oscilloscope, give the PicoScope 2204A a consideration. For more details on why I feel that way, click the button below to see my full write review on element14.

Full PicoScope 2204A Review on element14

Appearance:PicoScope 2204A Review on element14
Outlet:element14
Format:Other