The latest AddOhms looks at why you need a pull-up resistor when using push-buttons. This video goes into what happens when you leave a pin floating, what a floating pin means, and how the pull-up works. You can get more information about the video on the AddOhms Episode page.

This tutorial is the 2nd time I’ve made a video on pull-ups. Despite being a single resistor, it can be a difficult topic for new hardware designers to understand. The pull-up video was the first video tutorial I ever made. In fact, the YouTube version uses YouTube’s “stabilization” algorithm, which gives the video a very warped feel.

AddOhms #15 shows improvements in skill over the past couple of years!

Question: What’s another topic that I need to cover in an AddOhms Tutorial? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Comments (6) | | Posted in Videos
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6 thoughts on “AddOhms #15: Pull-Up Resistors (and buttons)

  1. Nice tutorial,
    There is the other way to connect a resistor as pull-down from pin to ground and you can have a high-on signal.
    BTW you should add a reasonable value for the resistor. I prefer 10 or 20 kOhm there.

    • I agree. I use pull downs much more than pull ups. Doesn’t invert the logic either. I use 10k across the board. Strong enough, with ok power consumption.