Semiconductor Measurements | Workbench Wednesdays Review

element14 Presents on YouTube
2018-08-07

When it comes to transistors, there are only so many things a multimeter can measure. The DCA Pro from PEAK Electronics makes short work of testing parts like a transistor. This small device can determine pinout, component type, and essential parameters in a matter of seconds. Not only that, but it can be connected to a (Windows) PC and draw parameter curves. Check out the video review to see how the device and software works. Then head over to the element14 page where you can download a zip file full of example parts I measured for you. The free to download software can open them.

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7 MOSFET Myths and Misconceptions Addressed

Let's set some things straight

MOSFET Myths and Facts

The most popular AddOhms video is my short tutorial on MOSFET basics. In the years since I posted the video, people have sent me many questions. While answering those questions I’ve learned quite a bit as well. For example, in that video, I say that Vgs is the threshold to turn on the MOSFET. Well, it turns out, that is not entirely true. It is the threshold to turn it off! Oops. Minor point with a subtle difference, but a common MOSFET misconception.

In this post, I dispel that and other common myths and misconceptions around using MOSFETs. As with all engineering tips and tricks, this post is not a definitive guide to FETs. Instead, it is meant to be a guide to help you ask the right questions to design in the correct part.

1. Misconception: You don’t need resistors on the gate

Back when I made the AddOhms episode, I added a resistor to the MOSFET’s gate pin. Of course any time a resistor is shown in a schematic, people get worried about what complicated formula is needed to determine its value. For slow switching applications, like below 10 kHz, the resistor value doesn’t matter. Something in the 100 to 1000 KOhm range is fine.

P-Channel with series gate resistor

P-Channel with series gate resistor

So if the value does not matter, why have one? The gate of a MOSFET is a small capacitor. And what happens when applying a voltage to a capacitor? It starts charging.

Resistor-Capacitor Charging Curve: Voltage and Current

Resistor-Capacitor Charging Curve: Voltage and Current

The initial current is very high. It slows down as the capacitor charges. That initial current rush, also known as in-rush current, can be a problem. Even though it is a short time, there is a significant current surge which can damage an I/O pin. Depending on the size of the MOSFET’s gate capacitance, it may not be necessary to include that resistor. I wish I could say to “just” add it any time you use a MOSFET. If there is a high switching frequency, say 100 kHz or higher, then you have to worry about the RC charging curve created by the resistor and the gate capacitance.

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Low side vs. High side transistor switch

Why do these both exist, how do they work, and when do you use them?

Low switch vs High switch Banner

A common task for a transistor is switching a device on and off. There are two configurations for a transistor switch: low side and high side. The location of the transistor determines the type of circuit and its name. Either transistor configuration can use a BJT or MOSFET.

In this post, I draw the configuration for both transistor types, talk about which requires a driver, and explain why you would use either. If you are new to transistors, check out the resource links at the bottom. I have a couple of videos I made and some from element14’s The Learning Circuit which do a great job introducing transistors.

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Answering BJT questions with Karen on element14’s The Learning Circuit

element14's The Learning Circuit
2019-01-02

Over on element14, Karen hosts The Learning Circuit. It is a tutorial show geared towards learning STEM basics. So far she has covered subjects like soldering, diodes, and how to make a DIY electromagnet. She did a great job on introducing BJTs and how they work. While I thought she provided a clear explanation of the internal workings, some members of the element14 community still had questions.

She invited me on to revisit BJTs and transistors to (hopefully) clarify the connection between how transistors physically work and how to use them.